Reloading.

Even though reloading (or hand-loading) can be a chore, I do admit I like it. It submerges me in a sort of meditative state and blocks the BS that might be floating around inside the empty spaces in my head. For somebody who can barely differentiate between grit 100 sandpaper and a silk scarf by touch, the fact that my fingers can detect a small imperfection on a case mouth when I am reloading amazes the heck out of me.
And, of course the fact that I can crank ammo at whatever time I want without having to wait for the store to open is a big plus. Tailoring your rounds to the gun or the goal you want achieve (No, I don’t do IDPA gaming rounds. My bullets do not bounce of the cardboard on cold days) will teach you more about ammunition than 300 hours of cool tactical TV shows.

But sure as hell I am getting a progressive. This thing of getting old and cranky is a biotch šŸ™‚

6 Replies to “Reloading.”

  1. FYI the Lee single stage is awesome, but as their units really suffer as they get more complicated. My Pro 1000 is really showing its age of all of 5the years, I wish I had gone Dillion out of the box.




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  2. Still wondering. I hear a lot about Dillon’s service and then again I hear too much about Dillon Service. Feels like small crap is always breaking, you know?
    And I am seriously tempted price wise with the Lee Loadmaster.




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  3. “It submerges me in a sort of meditative state and blocks the BS that might be floating around inside the empty spaces in my head. ”

    I can completely relate! My reloading time is wind down, relax, stop and think time. Love it…

    PS – Progressive is awesome! Red, blue, whatever floats your boat! I still use my single stage quite a bit for test runs, rifle cartridges, and general tinkering.




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  4. Stuff will break. That’s the nature of progressive presses. Your little Rockchucker equivelent has like 3 moving parts, a progressive has at least 100. You’re going to screw the thing up, just get used to that now. It takes some time to get the feel of the thing. Get a Dillon 650 with the brass feeder, get a spare parts kit, and just don’t worry about it. When you inevitably try to force something, or if you’re like me and you put something on upside down and the whole thing stops working, call Dillon and the won’t laugh at you. Even if what you put in upside down is pretty obviously upside down. If some small part breaks, it’s in the spares kit, they’ll tell you how to put it in, and send you a free one to put back into the kit.




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  5. I’m a Lee man, I use a Load Master for pistol loading. Works great except it will occasionally give you upside down primers. I switched to hand priming.
    In your picture you have a spray lube bottle…usually not needed for pistol reloading with carbide dies.




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