TSA “security” measures and how they kill.

This is a capture from the video you’d probably seen enough by now:

When I was watching this video the second or third time and thinking what to do and how to help those injured, something struck me like a sledgehammer on the chest: I would probably have to do so without any tools whatsoever, and that means nothing at all in the way of a half assed trauma kit. No gauze, no hemostatic agents, no tourniquets, no Israeli bandage and not even a frigging pen knife to cut sleeves or fashion field expedient bandages. At most, the best one could do would be to have somebody press over a wound with his/her hands as hard as they could and watch the wounded die.

Is it even possible a travel emergency kit that could be taken through the TSA and inside the plane with you? It is worth looking into it. For baseline purposes, let’s say that we are looking into a kit that would fit in a Netbook/ iPad bag (1o x 8 x 1 inches) and a quart zip bag (7 x 7 7/16 x 0.5 inches.) Start giving ideas in the comment section, sizes of the items will help a lot.

And check what the TSA allows in carry-on luggage.

12 Replies to “TSA “security” measures and how they kill.”

  1. They would hold you for questioning about the bandage scissors in your trauma kit, and ask you what you plan to do with that Israeli bandage….




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  2. I’ve had my trauma shears pass through without remark, and I’ve had them confiscated. They are something to draw their attention to which should then be permitted by their rules regarding scissors.

    Also, my travel IFAK is not just trauma-related which might draw attention.

    A zip-loc of 4x4s mashes pretty flat, too.




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  3. Don’t get me started on the TSA.

    They confiscated my 5 inch kubotan (a simple cylindrical tube about 1.5 cm in diameter with blunt ends). While it is a martial arts weapon, it has no sharp edges and it just slightly larger than a stout pen. They called over the sheriffs to do a check on me and photographed it like I was some criminal before impounding it.

    When someone says security Kabuki theater, I nod vigorously. They would not know real security if it bit them on the hind quarters and held on.




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      1. I understand you are probably fine with a kubotan if I have read your other posts correctly.

        For any ignorant control freaks out there, yes, it is called an inpact weapon. However, my writing pen and even my pinky fingers could be weapons, too.

        My belt is a garrot, my shoes are missiles, and my iPad can simply bludgeon someone unconscious.

        None of which will suffice to commandeer a plane or bring it down. That’s the critical point.

        Weapon is too strong a word for the limited value of a fist-sized metal tube.

        The palpable excitement the TSA exhibited over seizing it (check the box mentality) shows just how much they are incompetent.




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  4. My standard carry-on includes a trauma kit.. bandages, gauze, TQ, chest seals, tape, hemostatic agent. Water. Powerbars. Flashlight. Paracord.
    And stuff.
    Feeling a little less paranoid now.




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    1. Patrick. Paramedics that will NOT be allowed on the scene until the cops have cleared the location. That could take way too much time. Authorities still won’t give an estimate as how many died at The Pulse nightclub from blood loss that could have been treated but was not because the scene was not “secured.”




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  5. My first thought would be “stay out of airports” but that does impose limits on travel distances and time. Of course, so does death.

    Know that Major airports have fully equipped paramedics on site. By golly, you’re right ! And, if several are standing right next to you with their equipment when you get shot you may have a chance of surviving.




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