“Those who forget the past..”

The Navajo Nation is facing Gun Registration. I would love to say that Custer is Alive and Well and head of the Bureau of Indian Affairs, but no. This time is a fellow Native American that wants Gun Control in extremis.
Meet Davis Filfred:

If the bill is passed, a registry known as the Firearms Registration and Transfer Record would be established. Gun owners would need to meet several prerequisites in order to walk in line with the law. The stipulations presented in the bill include that gun owners would need to register weapons with an ID, proof of residency, a bill of sale, and the weapon’s serial number.

Source: NAVAJO NATION GUN CONTROL – Navajo Post Newspaper

I found the bill online and it is what back in the 90s was called “A good First Step to solve the Gun Problem.”

What could go wrong? In case nobody over there knows, registration always leads to confiscation. If they don’t know you have it, they cannot take it away!

Well, at least one member of the Navajo Nation raised a complain on the record. Tom Hanasbah from the Navajo Nation Office of Special Education and Rehabilitation Services:

You’d figure by now some lessons must be ingrained in the DNA, but apparently not. Let’s see how far this thing goes.

8 Replies to ““Those who forget the past..””

  1. “…except the firearms in possession or under the control of the Navajo Nation.”

    No reason to keep track of the weapons used by government agents and government agencies. Those firearms will never, ever be abused, because everyone in government are saints and angels, never corrupt or fallible human beings.

    The peasants always must be watched over and controlled by their betters. This seems to be a universal cross cultural social desire by those in charge.




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  2. A bill of sale? I have firearms I’ve owned for over 30+ years; does anyone here think I have (or can find) a bill of sale for those guns? What about used guns, bought, gifted, or inherited from friends/relatives who may have died/moved to our next plane of existence many years ago?

    And lacking a bill of sale, do these guns become contraband, available for seizure? If not now, then perhaps later, after they’ve been registered as not being clearly identifiable as legal property of the current possessor? I mean, if you can’t PROVE you bought them legally, you can’t be allowed to keep them, right (if you think this is crazy, ask any anti-gun person about it)?

    Think about it; just a few of the ways a “harmless” law like this could be abused.




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  3. If Mr. Filfred thinks this law will deter the criminal element from using/abusing firearms he’s been hitting the fire water too heavily.




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  4. Confiscation may not follow….but they’re likely to do what Chicago did 30 years ago. After passing mandatory registration laws, a few years later they “closed” registration for handgun, thereby shutting the door to all future gun ownership.
    Sick.




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  5. It has been a while, but when I lived in AZ I don’t recall violent crime being that big of a problem. Alcoholism, drunk driving and suicide (usually combined with alcoholism) seemed to be much worse. BTW alcohol is generally prohibited on reservations (except for casinos), but collectivly Native Americans have the highest incidence of alcoholism of any ethnic group in America.




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