I was at the bookstore just before Christmas, when book on the Young Adult table caught my eye.

Before anybody gives me guff, there are some books that are listed as YA fiction that are very good.  The Abhorsen trilogy by Garth Nix is out-fucking-standing, and the Raven Cycles by Maggie Stiefvater is also exceptionally well written.  The world-building in these novels is far better than in a lot of adult fiction.

But I digress…

The book that I saw was called Internment and the cover art featured a girl with a “Resist” hat and an Islamic crescent behind barbed wire.

Oh, for fuck’s sake.

Here is the summary of the book:

Internment by Samira Ahmed is a young adult novel about the forced detention of Muslims in America. Set in a dystopian alternate universe described by the author as “fifteen minutes in the future,” Internment is a response to the growing Islamophobia sweeping the globe. The story begins with a recently elected president introducing Muslim Registry and Exclusion Laws while creating a “model camp” called Mobius. The site for the construction of Mobius Camp is near the notorious Manzanar War Relocation Center, an internment camp used to imprison Japanese-Americans during World War II. The anti-Muslim climate shifts quickly from burning books written by Muslims to a curfew for Muslims to Muslims losing their jobs based on their religion to, finally, the passing of a law that rounds up all Muslims and places them in internment camps.

Layla Amin, the novel’s protagonist, is a high school student recently suspended from school for kissing her boyfriend in public. Her father, a former college literature professor, is accused by local police of writing seditious material. His books of poetry are among the books by Muslim authors that are burned at the beginning of the novel. The family is forced onto a train, taken to an internment camp, and tattooed with ID numbers. Throughout the novel, there are parallels made to the treatment of Jewish people in Nazi Germany as well as to the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II. Once inside the internment camp, the family are monitored by security cameras, drones, and searchlights. Razor-wired electric fences surround their FEMA-styled trailers. The director of the camp implements a divide-and-rule method of controlling the internees. This method involved separating the Muslim groups by race, nationality, and ethnicity, intentionally dividing them to prevent any organized uprisings. Layla seeks out members from each of these communities to create a unified front against the internment camp director.

Layla and her allies—her boyfriend, David; Ayesha; Soheil; and a sympathetic security guard named Jake—are determined to expose the human rights violations of the camp. She organizes a rebellion among the young people of the camp…

Let’s take this apart, shall we?

Set in a dystopian alternate universe described by the author as “fifteen minutes in the future,” Internment is a response to the growing Islamophobia sweeping the globe.

Really?  Were Muslims rounded up after 9/11?  After the Fort Hood shooting?  The Chattanooga recruiting center shootings?  San Bernardino shooting?  Charlie Hebdo shooting?  The Nice truck attack?  The 2017 and 2019 London bride stabbings?  The 7/7 bombings?  The Pule Night Club shooting? The mass sexual assaults at New Year’s eve in France?

How about the most recent Pensacola Naval Air Station shooting?  We didn’t even round up all the Saudi military personnel in the US and ship them home.

I think the Pulse shooting is still the most offensive.  Because after the smoke cleared and before the bodies were even buried, the Disarm Hate campaign managed to rewrite that from a shooting committed by a Muslim who was pledged loyalty to ISIS, to being the fault of Christian Conservatives who don’t like to see two men kissing.

If we’re 15 away from something, entering the Muslims isn’t it.

The anti-Muslim climate shifts quickly from burning books written by Muslims to a curfew for Muslims to Muslims losing their jobs based on their religion to, finally, the passing of a law that rounds up all Muslims and places them in internment camps.

So… doing what the Democrat President FDR did, with the help of a Chief Justice FDR appointed.  I love how the Left can acknowledge Korematsu but can’t ever take credit for it.

Layla Amin, the novel’s protagonist, is a high school student recently suspended from school for kissing her boyfriend in public.

What?  It seems to be the biggest problem facing Muslim girls isn’t a Republican government stopping them from kissing their boyfriends but having Muslim men whose advances were spurned throw acid in their faces.

Her father, a former college literature professor, is accused by local police of writing seditious material. His books of poetry are among the books by Muslim authors that are burned at the beginning of the novel.

My incredulity is peaking.

Right now, the most dangerous thing to do on campus is to say something that is pro-conservative or pro-Israel.  That makes angry Leftists burn things on campus.  Colleges love to book anti-Semitic/anti-Zionist speakers.  The most Left-leaning campuses will even let Students Set Up Shrine to Palestinian Terrorists, deliver eviction notices to Jewish students, and have a week-long orgy of Jew-hatred masquerading as a “Palestinian rights” event.

The family is forced onto a train, taken to an internment camp, and tattooed with ID numbers. Throughout the novel, there are parallels made to the treatment of Jewish people in Nazi Germany as well as to the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II.

This is amazing, considering the amount of Holocaust denial or downplay in the Islamic world, even by Muslim members of the US Congress, with Iran hosting an annual cartoon contest on the subject, and the common opinion among Muslims that the Jews made up the Holocaust for sympathy to get Israel.

This method involved separating the Muslim groups by race, nationality, and ethnicity, intentionally dividing them to prevent any organized uprisings. Layla seeks out members from each of these communities to create a unified front against the internment camp director.

The Islamic world is disastrously tribal.  Most of the violence in the UK right now is Muslim on Muslim from different nationalities or tribes.  The reason Israel has remained undefeated in war is that the Jordanians, Syrians, Egyptians,  Lebanese, and others hate each other so much, they can’t unite long enough to kill the Jews.  Tlaib and Omar might consider each other sisters but interred Somalis and interred Iranians are not going to work together for a red second.

Layla and her allies—her boyfriend, David; Ayesha; Soheil; and a sympathetic security guard named Jake—are determined to expose the human rights violations of the camp.

Did I miss when the Left-wing media was defeated and didn’t start screaming about this from the very beginning?

She organizes a rebellion among the young people of the camp…

With the help of all those anti-gun Leftist young people.

I think the most honest statement came from this review in Bookriot:

THE EVENTS OF INTERNMENT ARE ALREADY A REALITY FOR MANY UIGHUR MUSLIMS.

Reports of deaths and disappearances are widely documented by the families of those who have been detained for no other reason than practicing a faith that the state wants to criminalise.

This is the Leftist Islamic version of The Handmaid’s Tale.  The Left loves to say that The Handmaid’s Tale is “happening in real life.”  This is what they say America will become if we don’t give Planned Parenthood a half-a-billion dollars a year in taxpayer funding.  What they refuse to admit is that the IRL Handmaid’s Tale is happening in Iran, Saudi Arabia, and the Palestinian territories.  They can’t admit it.

So the IRL Internment is happening in China, the country the Left is in the process of kowtowing itself to for money and out of ideological approval.

Everything in the summary of this book is the opposite of reality.

Really, if this book is 15 minutes in the future, it’s the Muslims and Leftists rounding up the Zionists and MAGA hat wearers for political reeducation.

But no one likes to admit that they are the oppressor, it feels much better to be the victim.  When you can’t be the victim, you make it up.

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By J. Kb

8 thoughts on “When you can’t be a victim, you make it up- the Novel”
    1. It’s already worn out with a significant number of people. The same old story gets tiring to hear after a few decades.

      1. Might be worn out with some folks, but it seems to work just fine on politicians. Every time there is a jihad attack, the politicians knock each over trying to be the first to claim “this has nothing to do with islam.”

  1. If it’s 15 minutes in the future, just wait 5 more minutes and the camps will dissolve away like a mirage. Because then it will be 20 Minutes into the Future and we’ll be in Max Headroom’s world.

  2. It is the same story told in different words. The target always stays the same. People that don’t agree with them.

    We say “Gun registration leads to gun confiscation, we will not comply. It is the slippery slope”. They say “Paranoia!”

    They say “You aren’t letting us do what we want, death camps!” We say “What fantasy world are you living in?” “Well, it isn’t here yet, but the slippery slope you are always talking about says that you are going to throw (victim group of the day) into death camps because you are EVIL!”

    And it goes on and on in circles. They are accurately(Hah!) predicting the future but we are paranoid.

    It doesn’t matter how many times we show historical evidence of our point of view. It doesn’t matter how many times we show them evidence of them *telling* us that they want to take the next step. They will always deny it.

    They don’t need evidence of anything to make the accusation.

  3. It’s called psychological projection. Progressives feel hatred against everyone and everything including themselves. They cannot come to terms with this hatred but instead project these feelings of hatred on the subject of their hatred.

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