By Miguel.GFZ

Semi-retired like Vito Corleone before the heart attack. Consiglieri to J.Kb and AWA. I lived in a Gun Control Paradise: It sucked and got people killed. I do believe that Freedom scares the political elites.

30 thoughts on “My first thought about the 30 Super Carry ammunition.”
  1. Eh. Makes as much sense as anything else.

    If you keep down that path you wind up at the .22 TCM, the 5.7×28 or something similar. Not that there’s anything wrong with really high (for a pistol) velocity low-mass rounds. My .22 TCM is a hoot to take to the range, when it’s working.

  2. So this is… what… something like a .32 Super?
    What next, a .25 Super for next-gen vest-pocket pistols?
    Will there be a new crop of art deco pistols?

    1. One can hope!

      What can I say, I’m a sucker for weird guns and unusual operating mechanisms. (I drew the line at the new Rem R51, though.)

      1. For unusual, how about Neil Smith’s “StaggerCyl”? I want to build one some day. (I’ve got a sketch for the action… it’s a neat puzzle.)

        1. That’s a new one to me. Got a pointer? (Not something I really want to search for from work…)

          1. It’s a fictional revolver, prominently featured in his excellent SF novel “Ceres” (https://www.amazon.com/dp/B004D9FWH0/). Chambered in .270 REN, it gets its name from the fact that it has two barrels and 12 chambers in the cylinder, in a zigzag pattern. The fun challenge is to construct an action that will fire the correct chamber, alternating between inner and outer rings. I have a sketch for one. Wanted to build at least a model and give it to Neil, didn’t manage to do so while he was still alive. Sigh.

            Another fictional Neil design, that one from Pallas (the first novel in the series of which Ceres is second) is the “Ngu Departure”, a 10 mm straight blowback action with a tip-up barrel, and a frame build out of stacked sheet metal pieces in the fashion of the classic Master padlock. That one I haven’t figured out yet. (He describes something about the disconnector that I haven’t puzzled out, probably because I don’t sufficiently understand how disconnectors are constructed.)

            1. That sounds an awful lot like the Henrion, Dassy & Heuschen.

              I tried to post a link but it looks like the spam filter snagged it; search on those names and then click on the link to Silvercore Firearms Training for a pic.

              No special action needed to stagger the hammers – HDH found a rather elegant (in my opinion) solution to that problem.

              1. Ah. The gun Neil made up was called “Herron”, an obvious pun on the real thing. I didn’t know that one.
                What I was came up with is a Ruger style transfer bar mechanism for drop safety. More precisely, two transfer bars (inner and outer) connected to two locking bolts set 30 degrees apart, or alternatively engaging two separate set of locking notches.

                1. Sounds like it could be made to work. Maybe a cam like mechanism to move the transfer bars into position?

    2. I would love to see a return of modern version of the old super tiny Velo Dog double action only revolver with a folding trigger, utilizing something like a .25 Super (a centerfire .25 loaded to .22 Mag numbers).

      There’s the various NAA micro revolvers, but those are SAA.

  3. Cooper gave the answer years ago. The answer is to sell. Anything that will get a current firearm owner to spend money on something new is extra profit. Occasionally the manufacturers will come up with something that sticks(6.5 Creedmoor) but mostly its just this years hotness(30 AR) and winds up on Forgotten Weapons

  4. – – – for those FBI agents who are too sensative to recoil of the nine millimeter.
    This sarcasm is brought to you by fanbois of the 10 mm round.
    The round trusted and used by REAL men

    1. One of those problems is old farts like me with increasing arthritis in my hands. If this round is similar to the 327 Federal Magnum ballistics and has less recoil and, most importantly, results in an easier to rack pistol the size of the current micro nine carry pistols, I’ll probably buy one. I haven’t been able to talk myself into going to a 380 but this appears to have a ballistic advantage over the 380.

  5. At first I was thinking you were going with one of those Coonan Arms .30M1 carbine caliber 1911s. Now THAT would be a carry piece heh heh. I have to be careful, dont want to get “caliber crazy” .. interesting to see ballistics on the .30

  6. I think 30 Super Carry is a great idea. But I wouldn’t touch it without it become ubiquitous. This is why I am still handloading 9mm for $.11 per round on my supplies.

  7. As I’ve said elsewhere, I welcome the new .327 automag.

    I predict the same mass adoption and popularity as everyone’s recent favorite .224 Valkyrie.

  8. It’s the sequel to the 327 Fed Mag the semi auto version. I understand the theory.

    Small diameter, high velocity, not quite as powerful as the bigger cartridge it’s replacing but higher capacity.

    The 327 was duplicating 357 ballistics out of a short barrel and fit one more round in a J-frame size gun (Ruger LCR) than the 357 mag.

    Unfortunately I don’t think the extra cost will be offset by the increased capacity. 6 vs 5 in a snubby didn’t justify the 327 over 357. Practice ammo was 32 H&R, which was even harder to find. I had one and traded it for a LCR in 357 and shot 38 +P which was much more common.

    This looks like a 32 auto stretched to a 9mm OAL and loaded to 9mm pressure (also probably rimless not semi rimmed).

    I just don’t think 12 rounds makes that much difference over 10 when 9mm is ubiquitous and this will be a niche item.

    What would be cool is a PDW in this that held 40 rounds in a stick mag. That’s why the original CZ scorpion was popular. It held a lot of ammo being a 32.

  9. Gun owners: Why don’t we ever see innovation!?!
    Also Gun owners: This is just a solution looking for a problem!!

    There’s a niche lacking in the small calibers between the various anemic legacy mousegun ACP rounds (.25, .32, .380) and the various .357 service rounds (9mm, .38 Spec, et al). Something that will push a reliably expanding bullet to the FBI minimums- which the old ACP’s won’t- but isn’t tied to a larger platform.

    .327 Fed is a good start, and I hope this too will boost interest.
    And maybe someone will convert some of those cool old French SACM 1935A’s.

    1. Innovation is something done by people like St John of Ogden:JMBrowning, John Garand, Mikhail Kalashnikov, Eugene Stoner, Bill Ruger Sr., or Gaston Glock. It happens, at most, about once or twice a generation.

      Changing the bore diameter or other ephemerally important cartridge minutiae is something done by second-rate engineering twats who barely know which end of a gun the zippy little pellets come out of. It happens when the idiots who inherited the work of brighter men run out of intelligent ideas, and is about as earth-shatteringly important as making cars with or without tail fins. or changing the number of lug nuts upwards or downwards.

      Put in other terms, innovation is going from piston engines to jets.
      Changing the cartridge is like deciding to put the plane’s wings or elevators on high, or low,

      Much like standard rounds in long service, and the new idiocy, those two concepts are not interchangeable.

      When gun buyers see an actual innovation, there are versions of it from every manufacturer, in short order (or most usually, dragged kicking and screaming when their pet cartridge proves as popular as the Edsel), and you can’t keep them on the shelves, nor swing a dead cat at the firing range without hitting one.

      This is why everyone makes (or has made) a version of the 1911, a plastic handgun, and/or an AR-15, but the number of dead-cartridge weapons answering no one’s questions would fill boxcars.

      Almost as if Adam Smith knew what he was talking about in 1776. 😉

      The .30 Super Carry is likely going to prove as popular as the .47Auto, and the .43 Magnum. Which is why the gun rags will drool over it until the announcement of the .33 Super Carry, or the .28 Magnum, and buyers will yawn, burp, and fart.

      It is the armamental equivalent of the 20th guy in that movie to shout”I am Spartacus!.”

  10. In this case, the hoped for innovation is in the gap between .22lr/mag & the mousegun ACP rounds, and the .357 service rounds (9mm, .38spl, ect)

    There are those who can’t carry a service caliber handgun, so their options is basically an anemic mousegun that shoots something what won’t make FBI minimums. Likewise for those needing a NPE deep cover handgun or easy to tote BUG.
    The hope is this triggers some research in that area.

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